I feel your pain… now pay me!

Ardent followers of Daniel Goleman’s work on Emotional Intelligence will be delighted to learn that new research suggests emotional intelligence, in the from empathy, may yield more than productivity gains.

The Study:

  1. Psychologists at the University of Bonn conducted an international study exploring people’s ability to recognize emotions,
  2. Participants tasked with recognizing the emotions exhibited in pictures of faces and voice recordings were ranked on a scale,
  3. Coworkers and supervisors also ranked participants as to whether they were socially well-attuned, influential, sincere, good networkers, etc.

The Results:

  1. 1) Data suggested a correlation between high scores on both rankings and higher income levels,
  2. 2) Lower scores tied to lower incomes.

Implications:

Research continues to link relational competencies to financial success. From the IBM study suggesting each active member of our network equates to $948 in net worth to common sense logic that the more people that know who you are, understand your capabilities and care about your success; the greater the chance you’ll succeed.

Fortune Cookie Bottom Line:

It is better to have more friends about than to be down and out…

 

Source: http://www3.uni-bonn.de/Press-releases/it-pays-to-have-an-eye-for-emotions

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Are you good enough? Smart enough? Do people like you?

If you’ve attended one of my live workshops, you’ve probably heard me explain research showing that:  people are six — count’em six — times more likely to do for you, than we are willing to ask for. 

I’ll bet you can think of someone that’s gotten something or done something you should have gotten or done — all because they were pushy — unashamedly willing to ask and keep asking for whatever was on their mind.  If we could just summon up the courage to ask ourselves, we’d be able to lay claim to other people’s willingness to help!

But it’s more than that.  It’s more than simply having the nerve to ask.

For many, it’s all a symptom of social anxiety disorder (SAD).

Lots of us have SAD to some degree or another. While it’s my job to speak before large stadium-sized crowds or handfuls of folks that barely fill a conference room, I don’t recall ever being nervous. But, put me in social setting with people I don’t know and I’ll feel awkward and out of place till the ice breaks (then watch out dance floor!).

New research from Washington University in St. Louis suggests that SAD not only affects what you get but lessens your perception of the strength of your relationships.

THE STUDY:

  1. 1) 112 people were paired in a study with a non-romantic friend.
  2. 2) Each pair completed an evaluation of the strength of their relationships.
  3. 3) People with social anxiety had a strong tendency to report that their friendships were not as strong as their friends saw it.

IMPLICATIONS:

It’s estimated that 13% of the U.S. and European populations have been diagnosed with some form of social anxiety disorder and lots more probably have SAD to some degree but haven’t been diagnosed.

When you think about what you should be doing to advance your career or deepen your personal relationships, you probably think about developing a new skill, reading a book or getting in better shape.

However, real advancement of our goals may be as simple as forcing ourselves to ask for what we want and believing that people care about us as much as we care about them.

Reminds me of that old Saturday Night Live skit when the character Stuart Smiley offers his mirror his daily affirmation, “I’m good enough. I’m smart enough. And doggone it, people like me.”

Source: https://news.wustl.edu/news/Pages/27665.aspx

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Are you politically correct? It may affect your productivity…

  1. 1) Political correctness sometimes gets a bad rap by people who think that it is just a way to censor their right to free speech; however, Cornell University has proven that it can actually increase the creativity of work teams that are comprised of both men and woman.
  2. 2) This is challenging the idea that in order to have a truly creative team, everyone should be allowed to speak their minds, whatever the consequence.
  3. 3) Political correctness is shown to help people feel more comfortable while sharing their creative ideas, because it reduces the insecurity they might feel while interacting with others, especially those of the opposite sex.

Can you tell the difference between being politically incorrect and being candid?

Source: http://www.newswise.com/articles/this-just-in-political-correctness-pumps-up-productivity-on-the-job

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Are you talking to me? … Why the sound of your voice matters

FACTS:

  • - Hardcore politico, long viewed as a hardened authoritarian, suffers a stroke.
  • - His voice and intonation were changed forever.
  • - He quickly went from being considered authoritarian by his party’s followers to compassionate.

The question is…WHY?

RESULTS:

  1. 1. Researchers at the University of California looked at the vocal presence of charisma across different cultures and found that people who spoke in certain ways (low fundamental rate of vocal fold vibration) were more likely to be perceived as dominant.
  2. 2. Conversely, findings indicated that people who spoke with a high fundamental rate of vocal fold vibration (think Urkel from that old TV show Family Matters) were viewed as submissive.
  3. 3. Interestingly, this is also seen in non-human primates as well…

IMPLICATIONS FOR YOU:
Want to be a charismatic leader, there’s lots to do… but when it comes to how you communicate verbally, it’s one part biology, one part use of language.

Looks like the legendary actress Deborah Kerr knew what she was doing when she taught Yul Brenner how to “speak properly” in the King And I. He brought the low fundamental rate of vocal fold vibration and she brought the culture.

Bottom line: It’s not just that “the rain in Spain falls mainly on the plain,” it’s how you say it…

Happy Halloween!

Source: http://www.newswise.com/articles/the-science-of-charismatic-voices

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Stranger Danger! Even kids see though our hype…

3-5 Smart Things to Consider

  1. 1) Selling and the art of storytelling go hand in hand.
  2. 2) The more complex our selling environment, the more complex our solutions tend to be.
  3. 3) Increased competition forced the move from features & functions to visions and values selling.
  4. 4) Selling vision and value is where the margin was but presented a tantalizing temptation for story-sellers to stray from hard reality into the netherworld of plausibly believable embellishment.
  5. 5) New research sounds a warning for salespeople tempted to paint-the-picture better than it really is…because even kids can see right through you… Social cognition, skepticism and critical thinking are no long the stuff of sophisticated adults.

Research in Brief

By age five, children have learned to sniff out fact from fantasy; hesitating to believe people who make over-confident claims.

The Experiment

  1. 1) Children viewed one of two short videos of adults spouting facts:
    1. a) Video 1- the adult sounded unsure of the true details,
    2. b) Video 2- the adult sounded very confident stating false details,
    3. c) Children were asked whom they believed more.

The Results?

  1. 1) It was about a 50/50 split among kids closer to age 4; however,
  2. 2) By the time kids neared age 5, they were more likely to believe the person who sounded unsure!

What’s it mean to you?

Everybody sells but no one has all the answers and we shouldn’t act like we do…

Success awaits those that stop selling to others and instead form a partnership to learn with them…

Source: http://www.concordia.ca/news/stories/cunews/main/stories/2014/10/08/trying-to-fool-akindergartnernotsofast.html

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Multitasking… Bad for you, but good for your kids

 

  1. 1)  It has always been thought that multitasking leads to poor performance, but that idea may now be a thing of the past.  Researchers have found the opposite to be true for adolescents.
  1. 2)  During the study, it was found that young high-media multitaskers were better at weeding out distractions but performed worse when asked to focus on a single task. Low multitaskers were less able to filter out distractions but seemed to focus better on single tasks.
  1. 3)  The study shows that people who have grown up with a lot of different media devices have developed an improved working memory and seem to perform better in distracting environments.

What do you think this is going to affect as younger generations join the workforce?

Source: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2014-10/aaop-rtb100314.php

 

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Want a to create a great team or marriage? …Then bring on the PAIN!

Have you ever wondered why you choose the friends you choose, like the people you like, marry the people you marry?

Instinctively, we’d probably answer by thinking about all the good things we see in those we hold closest – personality, values, interests but what about the bad stuff? Can negative feelings or experiences bond us?

  1. -  New research suggests that pain may actually bring people together and act as “social glue” for groups of people who have suffered the pain together. And this conclusion actually makes sense—think about the relational bonds soldiers create from common experience.
  2. -  54 study participants were assigned either a painful or non-painful group task, like submerging their hands in cold ice water to locate and deposit medal balls into underwater containers (painful) or doing the same task in room temperature water (no big deal).
  3. -  Post task, the participants were asked to rank how close they felt to the others in their group.  And while the two groups didn’t show a difference in positive or negative emotion, they did show significant difference in feelings of group bonding.
  4. -  A continuation of the study showed that the groups that went through pain together were much more motivated to cooperate, as a group, during other subsequent challenges as well.

Can’t wait to hear how you feel about this topic…
What do you think?
Is your job painful enough as is?

Source: http://www.psychologicalscience.org/index.php/news/releases/shared-pain-brings-people-together.html?utm_source=pressrelease&utm_medium=eureka&utm_campaign=sharedpaincohesion

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3 Smart Things: Get your Assets in Gear… The Activity-Achievement Correlation

1)  New research has linked higher levels of physical activity with superior academic performance among grade-schoolers.
2)  More activity at recess correlated with reading prowess and involvement in organized sports added up to arithmetic superiority.
3)  Interestingly, the results didn’t seem to matter much amongst the females in the study. Are girls generally more active to begin with? Less innately competitive? Or just naturally smarter all around?

Implications:

-  Maybe it’s time to get out of our offices, get up off our collective Xbox-es, turn off SharkTank and move around a little…
-  Maybe my first boss was wrong when he said, “Never mistake activity for achievement!” But you can’t blame him–he wasn’t a girl.

Always look forward to hearing from you…write me and tell me your thoughts…

Source: http://www.uef.fi/en/-/runsaasti-liikkuvat-pojat-lukevat-ja-laskevat-paremmin-kolmena-ensimmaisena-kouluvuotena?redirect=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.uef.fi%2Fen%2Fhome%3Fp_p_id%3D101_INSTANCE_9vsFge3Ut5NJ%26p_p_lifecycle%3D0%26p_p_state%3Dnormal%26p_p_mode%3Dview%26

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I Know Who You Are, Saw What You Did and Know What You’re Planning…

Researchers examined 500 million tweets (that’s right a whole day’s worth for Justin Bieber) to develop algorithms with the power to predict behavior–hours in advance.

- A standard social media post includes when you posted, who you’re with, where you are, etc.

- Algorithms applied to social media data may allow researchers to predict what you are planning next—even before you do it.

Implications:

There’s always been a fine line between solid, preparatory relational research and being downright creepy but that won’t stop the steady drumbeat of capitalism! Many companies are exploring new ways to capitalize on your social media habits.

- Data from your toll-way EZ-pass may help predict when and where you’ll be parking your car – or at least the managers of the New York State Thruway think so.

- Xerox is also working to apply the concept to call center service…“What if you called a help line and they knew why you’d called before you said a word?”

Oh… And don’t even think about that thing – the thing you haven’t thought of yet – the thing you shouldn’t do – because someone, somewhere, may already know what you’ll have in mind…

Creepy.

Always look forward to hearing from you…write me and tell me your thoughts…

 

Source: http://discovere.binghamton.edu/features/tweets-5853.html

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Am I Selling or Are You Buying?

A friend of mine, who is Senior IT Executive in Mexico City, wrote me recently asking the age-old question, do salespeople and marketers sell or do customers buy?
We’ve asked this question to hundreds of sales people around the globe and here’s the consensus:

- Nobody likes to be sold anything and most everyone loves to buy stuff,

- When we are being sold something, our defenses are up and we typically experience some degree of buyer’s remorse after we make the purchase,

- BUT buying something is a real treat–everyone loves getting new stuff, having the latest gadget!

- If the buyer feels in control and co-develops the solution with the seller — chances of sales success skyrocket.

WHAT’S THE BIG TAKEAWAY?

…Give your PowerPoint presentations a rest and pick up a dry erase marker. Stop presenting and start co-creating. Sketch out your offer/project/idea with the person considering it.

Death-by-PowerPoint-is out.

Co-creation is in!

-Jeff

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