Tag Archives: Research

New Research, Sheds New Light on Hump Day

When do you checkout of work and check into the weekend?

OFFICAL CHECKOUT TIME FROM WORK

Friday, 5:00 PM

Apparently not!

Using a proprietary survey technology, our latest research sought to pinpoint the exact time people move from focusing on work, to working on the weekend.

CHECKOUT TIME FOR MOST OF US?

Thursday, 9:52 AM

Across all categories (age, gender, education). What about you?

WHO STAYS CHECKED IN THE LONGEST?

Friday, 9:26 AM

Those that stay focused the longest, coincidentally have been around the longest! A tip of the hat to our senior most workers, aged 65+, who maintain concentration on work the longest of any category.

WEIRD THING IS: The distribution bows inward with 24-34’s & 35-44’s reporting the earliest checkout time of any age groups. Hmm 24-44…You don’t think the demands of having young kids plays into this, do you?

DOES MORE EDUCATATION = MORE FOCUS?

Thursday, 4:19PM

The weekend tipping point generally follows educational level with Master’s and PhD holders keeping their minds on work the longest BUT those with Associates Degrees posted the greatest staying power!

WHO CHECKS OUT FIRST: MEN OR WOMEN?

Wednesday, 4:36PM

Men maintain their workweek concentration longer – and by a comfortable margin – as women reported shifting focus nearly a half-day earlier than men (Female = Weds @ 4:36PM, Male = Thurs @ 11:33AM). Wouldn’t have been my bet!

BEYOND THE GIGGLE IMPLICATIONS OF CHECKOUT TIME

  • Use your team’s checkout time to refocus their efforts on what can be accomplished for the rest of the week?
  • Checkout time might be the PERFECT time to start holding your weekly staff meetings!!

Now it’s your turn…go field test these findings with your coworkers, significant other and even your boss! Then share what you’ve learned by writing me directly atjeff@jeffkaplan.com.

Stay connected,

-Jeff

You Know How THEY Are: The Flipside of Stereotypes

From a young age we’re taught that stereotypes are inappropriate, lead us to false conclusions and promote cultural biases that don’t have any place in a progressive society.

However, used correctly, stereotyping can be a powerful tool in your relational development efforts — provided you are willing to shed every part of the stereotypical picture you’d created once presented with the facts.

Stereotyping Best Practices

  1. Prepare. Use stereotypes as a means to prepare yourself for positive and productive interactions.
  2. Research. Create stereotypes through research. Understanding where someone went to school, when they went and what they studied can tell you a great deal about what they value and how they see the world.
  3. Discover. Use your research to find common ground (shared interests or experiences) that will help you begin to see him or her as a person instead of a name or title and allow you to begin the connection process, even before you meet.
  4. Let reality rule. Chances are the stereotype you’ve created isn’t accurate. That’s okay and expected. Start to disassemble your stereotype as you interact and begin to understand your new contact as a unique individual.

Example

You have two job interviews scheduled and of course you do a little research. Here’s what you find:

Interviewer #1
Graduated from Oxford in 1967 with a degree in microeconomics. He’s single and enjoys butterfly collecting.

Interviewer #2
Graduated from Berkley in 1992 with a degree in psychology. She’s married with four kids and plays in a Jazz band on the weekends.

1. If you had to choose only one interview, which would it be?
2. Which interviewer are you most likely to connect with?
3. Would you change your approach in each interview?

Stereotyping is hardwired into each of us, a defense mechanism that helps to keep us safe from the unknown. Learning to use what your brain does naturally can help you rapidly accelerate your relationship development efforts.

As always, I welcome your thoughts at Jeff@jeffkaplan.com.

Stay connected,

-Jeff