Tag Archives: Work

New Research, Sheds New Light on Hump Day

When do you checkout of work and check into the weekend?

OFFICAL CHECKOUT TIME FROM WORK

Friday, 5:00 PM

Apparently not!

Using a proprietary survey technology, our latest research sought to pinpoint the exact time people move from focusing on work, to working on the weekend.

CHECKOUT TIME FOR MOST OF US?

Thursday, 9:52 AM

Across all categories (age, gender, education). What about you?

WHO STAYS CHECKED IN THE LONGEST?

Friday, 9:26 AM

Those that stay focused the longest, coincidentally have been around the longest! A tip of the hat to our senior most workers, aged 65+, who maintain concentration on work the longest of any category.

WEIRD THING IS: The distribution bows inward with 24-34’s & 35-44’s reporting the earliest checkout time of any age groups. Hmm 24-44…You don’t think the demands of having young kids plays into this, do you?

DOES MORE EDUCATATION = MORE FOCUS?

Thursday, 4:19PM

The weekend tipping point generally follows educational level with Master’s and PhD holders keeping their minds on work the longest BUT those with Associates Degrees posted the greatest staying power!

WHO CHECKS OUT FIRST: MEN OR WOMEN?

Wednesday, 4:36PM

Men maintain their workweek concentration longer – and by a comfortable margin – as women reported shifting focus nearly a half-day earlier than men (Female = Weds @ 4:36PM, Male = Thurs @ 11:33AM). Wouldn’t have been my bet!

BEYOND THE GIGGLE IMPLICATIONS OF CHECKOUT TIME

  • Use your team’s checkout time to refocus their efforts on what can be accomplished for the rest of the week?
  • Checkout time might be the PERFECT time to start holding your weekly staff meetings!!

Now it’s your turn…go field test these findings with your coworkers, significant other and even your boss! Then share what you’ve learned by writing me directly atjeff@jeffkaplan.com.

Stay connected,

-Jeff

Work and Creativity

  1. A new study suggests that creativity outside of work can enhance job performance
  2. Creative activities outside of work seem to directly enhance the ability of employees to problem solve and help others on the job
  3. Researchers suggest organizations can encourage employees to pursue creative hobbies outside of work by sponsoring contests and offering discounts for supplies

Source: Kevin J. Eschleman, Jamie Madsen, Gene Alarcon, Alex Barelka. Benefiting from creative activity: The positive relationships between creative activity, recovery experiences, and performance-related outcomes. Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, 2014

Performance and Work Environment

  1. Attempts to change the social or physical workplace environment do have positive effects on work-related outcomes
  2. Changes to the social environment seem to lead to better work performance
  3. Changes in the physical environment seem to help workers concentrate

Source: Effectiveness of a Combined Social and Physical Environmental Intervention on Presenteeism, Absenteeism, Work Performance, and Work Engagement in Office Employees. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 2014